AFRIKAS ROLL I SLAVERIET

I Jamaica Gleaner skriver Martin Henry om Afrikas roll i den internationella slavhandeln:
The great early 20th-Century black writer of the Harlem Renaissance, Zora Neale Hurston, bitterly complained that ”the white people held my people in slavery here in America. They I Jamaica Gleaner skriver Martin Henry om Afrikas roll i den internationella slavhandeln:
The great early 20th-Century black writer of the Harlem Renaissance, Zora Neale Hurston, bitterly complained that ”the white people held my people in slavery here in America. They had bought us, it is true, and exploited us.
But the inescapable fact that stuck in my craw was: My people had sold me… My own people had exterminated whole nations and torn families apart for a profit before the strangers got their chance at a cut. It was a sobering thought. It impressed upon me the universal nature of greed.” And we might add, the universal nature of slavery.
African kings were willing to provide a steady flow of captives, who they said were criminals or prisoners of war doomed for execution. Many were not, but this did not prevent traders posing as philanthropists who were rescuing the Africans from death and offering them a better and more productive life.
When France and Britain outlawed slavery in their territories in the early 19th Century, African chiefs who had grown rich and powerful off the slave trade sent protest delegations to Paris and London. Britain abolished the slave trade and slavery itself against fierce opposition from West African and Arab traders.
According to Basil Davidson, celebrated scholar of African history, in his book The African Slave Trade: ”The notion that Europe altogether imposed the slave trade on Africa is without any foundation in history … . Those Africans who were involved in the trade were seldom the helpless victims of a commerce they did not understand: On the contrary, they responded to its challenge. They exploited its opportunities.”
Until the 18th Century, very few Europeans had any moral reservations about slavery, which contradicted no important social value for most people around the world. In the Arab world, which was the first to import large numbers of slaves from Africa, the slave traffic was cosmopolitan. Slaves of all types were sold in open bazaars. The Arabs played an important role as middlemen in the trans-atlantic slave trade, and research data suggest that between the 7th and the 19th centuries, they transported more than 14 million black slaves across the Sahara and the Red Sea, as many or more than were shipped to the Americas, depending on the estimates for the transatlantic slave trade…
As Thomas Sowell, a black conservative American scholar, has pointed out the efforts of the European nations to wipe out slavery have been virtually ignored. ”Incredibly late in human history”, he writes, ”a mass moral revulsion finally set in against slavery – first in 18th-century England, and then during the 19th Century, throughout Western civilisation. But only in Western civilisation … Africans, Arabs, and Asians continued to resist giving up their slaves. Only because Western power was at its peak in the 19th Century was Western imperialism able to impose the abolition of slavery around the world – as it imposed the rest of its beliefs and agendas, for good or evil.”
The resistance put up by Africans, Asians and Arabs was monumental in defence of slavery and lasted for more than a century, Sowell writes. Only the overwhelming military power of the West enabled it to prevail on this issue, and only the moral outrage of Western peoples kept their Government’s feet to the fire politically to maintain the pressure against slavery around the world…had bought us, it is true, and exploited us.
But the inescapable fact that stuck in my craw was: My people had sold me… My own people had exterminated whole nations and torn families apart for a profit before the strangers got their chance at a cut. It was a sobering thought. It impressed upon me the universal nature of greed.” And we might add, the universal nature of slavery.
African kings were willing to provide a steady flow of captives, who they said were criminals or prisoners of war doomed for execution. Many were not, but this did not prevent traders posing as philanthropists who were rescuing the Africans from death and offering them a better and more productive life.
When France and Britain outlawed slavery in their territories in the early 19th Century, African chiefs who had grown rich and powerful off the slave trade sent protest delegations to Paris and London. Britain abolished the slave trade and slavery itself against fierce opposition from West African and Arab traders.
According to Basil Davidson, celebrated scholar of African history, in his book The African Slave Trade: ”The notion that Europe altogether imposed the slave trade on Africa is without any foundation in history … . Those Africans who were involved in the trade were seldom the helpless victims of a commerce they did not understand: On the contrary, they responded to its challenge. They exploited its opportunities.”
Until the 18th Century, very few Europeans had any moral reservations about slavery, which contradicted no important social value for most people around the world. In the Arab world, which was the first to import large numbers of slaves from Africa, the slave traffic was cosmopolitan. Slaves of all types were sold in open bazaars. The Arabs played an important role as middlemen in the trans-atlantic slave trade, and research data suggest that between the 7th and the 19th centuries, they transported more than 14 million black slaves across the Sahara and the Red Sea, as many or more than were shipped to the Americas, depending on the estimates for the transatlantic slave trade…
As Thomas Sowell, a black conservative American scholar, has pointed out the efforts of the European nations to wipe out slavery have been virtually ignored. ”Incredibly late in human history”, he writes, ”a mass moral revulsion finally set in against slavery – first in 18th-century England, and then during the 19th Century, throughout Western civilisation. But only in Western civilisation … Africans, Arabs, and Asians continued to resist giving up their slaves. Only because Western power was at its peak in the 19th Century was Western imperialism able to impose the abolition of slavery around the world – as it imposed the rest of its beliefs and agendas, for good or evil.”
The resistance put up by Africans, Asians and Arabs was monumental in defence of slavery and lasted for more than a century, Sowell writes. Only the overwhelming military power of the West enabled it to prevail on this issue, and only the moral outrage of Western peoples kept their Government’s feet to the fire politically to maintain the pressure against slavery around the world…

Summa summarum, BLM kan börja se sig i spegeln och åka hem till Afrika.

Varjager

One Response to AFRIKAS ROLL I SLAVERIET

  1. euroM skriver:

    …till dags datum finns inget ”slavskepp” på något museum någonstans inte ens i Usa…om trafiken från Afrika till Amerika var så omfattande så finns alltså inga av dessa skepp att ses övh taget.
    På YouTube finns de som minsann har bevis de hittat bla en man som håller i en en plankbit och påstår att den minsann är från ett slavskepp 🙂 däremot finns de som menar på att de svarta folken funnits en lång tid i Amerika samt Karibien och de har inga anknytningar till Afrika på något vis….
    I Västafrika tex finns inga sägner om att deras förfäder blivit bortrövade av främmande vita män och skeppats bort i stora skepp..
    sökning på det här ämnet har på ett par år filtrerats bort i mängder
    av Google därför att de vill inte du ska få en annan version av historien
    att skapa sk white guilt är en viktig ingrediens i maktspelet

    Bild: påstådda slavar packade som sardiner i ett sk ”slavskepp”
    på en resa flera månader….inget sådant skepp har hittils hittats intakt trots högst 250 års påstådd transatlantic handel med dem
    klcka för ev förstora

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